Breaking Through the Wall and Seeking a Healthy New Normal?

 

Are you just over the world being turned on its ear? Disillusioned, confused and worried? Wondering who to trust with so much conflicting information about how to maneuver through this pandemic? 

 

Healthy strategies to handle the new normal are based on the foundation for overall well being: emotional, physical, mental and spiritual health. 

Emotional Health

 

Constant worries about an invisible enemy stalking your friends, family and you is exhausting.

 

The continuous need to make difficult decisions, such as the question on whether to send your children to school (assuming schools open in the Fall) is draining. The inability to hug your close friends and family is frustrating. How can you improve your emotional health in the midst of such assaults?

Stressed Woman
Picnic in the park
  • Invest time in positive relationships – have a physically distancing visits at a park (maybe even a picnic in the park!)
  • Call your best friend to let him or her know you love them

 

  • Do things which bring you joy (maybe something creative like painting rocks or silly like dancing in the living room to the tunes from your high school years)
  • Exercise (it can be extremely satisfying to hit a heavy bag, just a thought)
  • Keep a journal – write both what is upsetting you and for what you are grateful
  • Practice mediation – which can help you learn how to still the relentless noise in your mind

 

Physical Health

 

Has it been challenging to leave the comfort of the couch? Does the fridge whisper to you that treats await within?

Does your brain whirl at night when you should be sleeping? Diet and supplements, movement and sleep are the underpinning of your physical health. One being out of balance affects the other. 

 

Couch Potato Dog

Improve the amount and quality of your sleep by:

  • Prioritizing sleep (being in bed) for at least 7 hours a night
  • Creating a nightly ritual
  • Limiting caffeine in the day (from coffee, tea, soda and chocolate)
  • Establishing a meditation habit, which will help you learn how to still your racing thoughts
  • Making your bedroom a sleep haven (a dark, cool, cozy room without your device within)

 

Sleeping Baby and Puppy

Increase your odds of establishing the habit of moving during the day by:

 

2 people hula hooping

  • Finding physical activities you enjoy (gardening, walking the dog, hula hooping)
  • Working out with a buddy (can both take a virtual exercise class together!)
  • Hiring a personal training / a virtual personal trainer
  • Blocking out exercise time in your schedule and keep your date with yourself
  • Eliminating potential obstacles (such as laying your exercise clothing the night before)

 

You are what you eat. Supercharge your health by:

  • Filling your plate and snacking on a wide array of fruits and vegetables
  • Finding inspiration from health food Instagram accounts and trying new recipes
  • Drinking plenty of water (try various infused water, like cucumber mint or strawberry water)
  • Incorporating healthy fats, whole grains and lean proteins in your meal planning
  • Taking supplements to boost your overall health and immune system

 

A healthy plate of food
Frowning face in a cup of coffee

Mental Health

 

How full is your cup today? Do you feel as though you are stretched to your limit? Is the relentless anxiety, overwhelm and fear wearing you down? Is healthy living possible when navigating dark times? How can you improve your mental health when dark thoughts, secret shame and undermining insecurities flood your mind?

  • Talk to a professional (via telehealth visits) about your pervasive worries and learn healthy coping strategies
  • Vent to a good friend about what is overwhelming you right now
  • Avoid toxic people / situations (which may mean limiting watching news programs)
  • Embrace your inner 5 year old and have a royal temper tantrum. Enjoy it to the max and then let it go.
  • Have compassion for yourself and others. The collective is simultaneously experiencing extreme stress. Be kind to all. 

 

Telehealth Visit
Spiritual Health

Spiritual Health

 

Spiritual health is achieved when you feel at peace with life, when you are able to find hope and comfort during dark times. Spiritual health helps you experience life completely. Spirituality is different for everyone. While not everyone believes in the existence of a deity, realizing that you are not the center of everything and focusing on the larger world or universe around you will enhance your spiritual health. Some of the benefits of spiritual wellness are obtaining clarity on self, happiness and purpose, deepened connections with others, experiencing more inner peace, and increasing your resilience.

You can improve your spiritual health by:

 

  • Meditating which allows you to be still with yourself, listening to the quiet voice within
  • Spending time in nature in quiet reflection and thought
  • Being creative, silly, joyful, and spending time exhaling and having fun
  • Performing random acts of kindness and listening with your heart
  • Radical self-care, eliminate toxic influences and relationships and respect the temple which is your body.
Meditation

The four cornerstones of your health are interwoven. One area being unbalanced will negatively impact the others. On the flip side, shoring up a neglected area will positively improve the whole of you. Focusing on the habits which will create a strong and healthy you will offer you the best chance to thrive during this pandemic.

 

To your health.
Dianne Hinton NP, PA, IFM-C

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Thrive In Uncertain Times

In March 2020, governments responded to the rapidly spreading coronavirus by shutting down the world. Schools closed. Non-essential businesses locked their doors. Travel was restricted.

Essential workers (doctors, nurses, grocery store workers, police officers, postal workers, truck drivers) faced exposure while everyone else sheltered at home, either alone or with direct family.  Many workers were furloughed or lost their jobs as bars, restaurants, non-essential retail, hair salons, hotels, and more ceased operation. Others quickly learned the technology required to work remotely.

Closed sign
Woman Working at Home with Kids around her

Many parents of school age children suddenly had to both work from home and homeschool their kids. Many parents have developed a new appreciation for their kids’ teachers!

 

Normal flies out the window and in its place is fear of getting a serious illness, working in a different way or unemployed in an uncertain economy, with children constantly under foot or being completely isolated.

Over the months, the number of cases and deaths have grown. Rapid opening leads to spikes in case, followed by spikes in deaths. 

 

Fear for our physical and economic health plagues us.

 

Can you say stressful?

Handling Emotional Stress

How did you handle the swirl of stress and emotions? Is a newly found passion for baking treats and enjoying those creations helping to sooth the anxiety (emotional eating to the rescue)? Since the gyms are closed, has exercise ceased (motivation to move disappeared)? Have you caught up on all of your favorite shows and discovered a number of new ones (couch potato time)?

 

Having an emotional temper tantrum is a reasonable response to these extraordinary circumstances. Eating without concern for calorie count or health helped many handle the relentless pressure. Cocooning on the couch compensated for the disappearance of their routine.  Watching amusing entertainment provided many the needed escape from the frightening daily reality.

Did emotional eating and other less than healthy coping methods help you to navigate these first few months of living in the middle of a pandemic? Now, over four months later, is the realization that this is our new normal dawning? The understanding is growing that our lives are not being upended for a short stretch, but instead we are in the middle of a marathon.

Baking Cookies

Surviving (Maybe Even Thriving) Today

 

What do we need to do to survive living with this potentially deadly disease in our world and communities for the duration? 

Coronavirus Health Guidelines

Continue Following Health Guidelines

First step, we all need to follow the medical guidelines to wash our hands, wear masks in public and maintain a physical distance from each other to reduce the spread of this virus.

Dust Yourself Off

Second step, time to stop having an emotional temper tantrum and embrace a healthy response to the constant stress, unease, and uncertainty. Don’t strive for perfection or make “a chocolate will never pass these lips again” declaration. Time to pick yourself off the floor and move towards a healthier response.

Moving Matters

 

The goal here is a healthy balance. A funny comedy followed by a dance party in the living room. Want to feel better? Move it! Start or end the day with a gentle yoga routine and/or stretching and/or cardio and/or strength training. There are wonderful online yoga and exercise classes. Many gyms have created virtual exercise classes. Call your gym to see if they have online classes. 

Here are some resource to give you an idea of what can be found to help you get strong, flexible and in shape (let them know that Calmglow told you about them):

Moving Matters

A Little Zen

Moving your body helps release stress and other stress management techniques such as journaling, meditation, and taking a moment to breath deeply are great help towards reclaiming a healthier you. A moment of calm can even help you sleep. And with a solid night of sleep under your belt, you can handle so much more!

You Are What You Eat

 

Next we turn our attention to what’s cooking in the kitchen. After all, food is the foundation of our health.

 

Getting creative in the kitchen

One of the benefits of working remotely is that we have more time to spend in the kitchen creating tasty, healthy food. While many turned to experimenting with baking and desserts when the lockdowns began, let’s now challenge ourselves to make delicious, healthy, comfort food. The Mediterannan Diet is one of the healthier diets with an added benefit that it is not based on elimination of a category of foods, such as carbohydrates.

The Mediterranean diets incorporated the traditional foods enjoyed in the countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea: Spain, France, Monaco, Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Greece, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, and Morocco. While most are more familiar with the foods of France, Greece, Italy and Spain, there is inspiration to be found from each country: Morrocan Tagine, Turkish Chicken Kebab, Lebanonese shawarma bowls and more.

When you are planning your cooking adventure, think about adding a rainbow of color to your plate: red peppers, purple cabbage, orange sweet potato, green broccoli, and yellow squash.

You can make your diet more Mediterranean-style by:

 

  • eating the rainbow of color of fruits and vegetables (organic, if possible)
  • eating whole grains and legumes 
  • eating lean proteins (fish, chicken, plant-based)
  • eating less meat and dairy products
  • choosing healthy fats, such as olive oil and nuts

 

To enhance the flavor of your meals (and the fun of your culinary adventure), add fresh herbs and spices. A tip: before starting on this kitchen adventure, purge your spice cabinet of old spices. Spices lose their flavor as they age.

 

A tip: watch your portion sizes. Too much of even a good thing can undermine your efforts.

A Mediterranean Feast

 

You have finished with your emotional temper tantrum. You are shaking your tail feathers, finding zen moments in the midst of COVID chaos, and dining on delicious (maybe even homemade!) dishes. One more area to improve: the home in which you are sheltering-in-place.

 

Pictures of rooms in a home

Make Your Home A Comfortable Nest!

Surround yourself with the objects that bring you happiness. Clear the clutter and the chaos. Play music that brings you joy or soothes your soul. Fill a vase with fresh flowers. Diffuse citrus, floral or spicy oils. Open the windows. Put a bowl of summer fruit on the kitchen table. Chill a pitcher of water with slices of cucumbers and mint to enjoy when the temperature rises. Toss a soft throw over the back of the sofa so you can wrap yourself in warmth on a cool morning. Place twinkle lights inside to enjoy once the sun sets.

 

Your home is your sanctuary and now you are spending more time there than usual. Make it a place you hate to leave.

Do not plan to change everything at once. Let go of your emotional temper tantrum. Make changes to bring balance back. Consistent, small steps create huge improvements. Create the health lifestyle that supports you during this new normal. 

 

To your health.

Dianne Hinton NP, PA, IFM-C

 

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Sleep, Glorious Sleep

“Sleep that soothes away all our worries. Sleep that puts each day to rest. Sleep that relieves the weary laborer and heals hurt minds. Sleep, the main course in life’s feast, and the most nourishing.”

William Shakespeare, Macbeth

 

Thoughts race. Sleep eludes. Again. 

 

Even in normal times, approximately 30% to 35% of the population experiences acute, or short-term, insomnia. Even before the pandemic, the National Health Institution found that sleep deficiency was a common public health problem. While sleep deprivation means that you did not get enough sleep, sleep deficiency means you have experienced one or more:

 

  • Did not get enough sleep
  • Sleep at the wrong time of day (out of sync with your body’s clock)
  • Don’t sleep well or get all of the different types of sleep that you need: rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM sleep (which has three different stages)
  • Have a sleep disorder, such as insomnia
Trying to sleep

Sleep is essential for survival. Amnesty International lists sleep deprivation as a form of torture. Social distancing and isolation, school closures, quarantines, working-from-home with the family at home, conflicting media reports, job losses and other challenges created by the pandemic are causing sleep deficiency for people who previously had no sleeping problems. 


Sleep deprivation is known to negatively impact blood pressure, heart rate, cognition, and more. In fact, research has found that the shorter the sleep one has, the shorter one’s life will be. Sleep offers wide-ranging benefits for physical and mental health.

Why Consistent Quality Sleep Is Important During a Pandemic

Cellular Repair

Sleep strengthens your immune system.

Sleep is one of your body’s defenses against infectious disease. During sleep, your body produces proteins that fight inflammation and infection.

Researchers have found that, while a lack of sleep can increase the odds of getting sick, consistent sleep helps your body to fight off disease and supports your overall health. Between seven to nine hours of sleep every night is recommended for optimal health.

 

 

Lack of sleep impairs your cognitive ability.

 

Research shows that sleep deprivation leads to poorer short-term memory, attention, and processing speed. During a time when complex information needs to be understood, mental acuity is imperative. Mental agility is required to address the challenges of working and attending school remotely. Good sleep helps to keep us mentally sharp.

 

Brain Power
Exhausted Man

Sleep improves your mood and mental health


Daily quality of sleep directly impacts your mood. Someone who is sleep deprived is more likely to be sad, irritable, frustrated, stressed out, fatigued, and/or similar emotions. Research at the University of California Berkeley found that without adequate sleep, parts of the brain that are related to anxiety tend to become more agitated.

 

 

Improving Sleep Through Sleep Hygiene

What is sleep hygiene? According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep hygiene is a variety of different practices and habits that are necessary to have good nighttime sleep quality and full daytime alertness. While there is not a single, best practice sleep hygiene for everyone, there are a number of daily habits that have proven to help most. Experiment with the following to find what helps you drift off each night. 

Sleep Schedule: Go to bed and wake up at consistent times, even during vacations or on weekends.

Get out in the daylight: Daylight affects your circadian rhythm.Your circadian rhythm is basically a 24-hour internal clock that is running in the background of your brain and cycles between sleepiness and alertness at regular intervals. It’s also known as your sleep/wake cycle.

Be active during the day: Exercise can help reduce stress which can improve your odds of having a good night’s rest. Avoid strenuous exercise close to bedtime. Stretching, yoga or an evening walk around the neighborhood are good activities to do closer to bedtime. 

Avoid caffeine, too much food, and alcohol near bedtime: While alcohol can help you fall asleep, it can disturb your sleep cycles.

Take a nap: A short nap in the middle of the afternoon can improve your mood and cognition. Avoid napping in the evening so as to not interfere with your night’s sleep.

Create an evening routine: Design a ritual which works for you. It could include turning off devices an hour before bed, a warm bath, mediation, journaling, yoga, even washing your face and brushing your teeth. A routine creates an association in your mind that now is the time for sleep. 

Turn your bedroom into a sleep haven: Address the issues of light, sound, temperature, even your mattress, which could be disturbing your sleep. A small change such as blackout curtains or a white sound machine could make a marked improvement.

Find ways to still your mind and relax. Find what helps you to still your mind and relax such as soothing music, mediation, and deep breathing.

In addition to sleep hygiene, there are supplements which can help your body copy with the additional stress you are experiencing, possible adrenal fatigue, or which can help you relax naturally. Call our office at Calmglow to schedule an appointment to discuss what could help you now.

To your health.

Dianne Hinton NP, PA, IFM-C

Sleep Hygiene
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Stress Relief Methods That Work

Stress is ever-present. In today’s new norm, anxiety and stress are reaching epic proportions for much of our population. While we cannot get rid of troubling news, we can employ techniques which are proven to reduce stress.

Meditation

1. Meditation

Meditation has been around for a long time. According to Wikipedia, in India, there is wall art from approximately 5,000 BCE showing individuals meditating and written evidence from around 1500 BCE. The practice of meditation stills one’s racing thoughts, brings mental clarify and reduces stress.

How To Meditate

There are many different meditation practices: Hindu, Buddist, Chinese, Christian, Guided, and more. There are podcasts and Youtube channels with guided and other mediations. Once the shelter in place recommendation is lifted, there are in-person retreats and meditation centers. While seeking the practice which best suits you can be useful, getting started with a basic daily habit now to start reducing your stress. Here are beginner meditation steps:

 

  1. Set aside time in your day, even a few minutes a day of consistently practicing meditation will reap a huge reward.
  2. Find a quiet place and time (maybe in bed right before you go to sleep or just as you wake up).
  3. Sit in a comfortable position (or lay down).
  4. Close your eyes.
  5. Focus on your breath.
  6. As your mind wanders, refocus on your breath.
  7. To end your meditation, open your eyes and hold the feeling of calm for a moment.
  8. Tip: you can sprinkle moments of meditation throughout your day to calm your mind, reduce your stress and gain more mental clarity.

 

2. Yoga

According to the History of Yoga, while the practice of yoga can be traced back 5,000 years, some believe that yoga maybe thousands of years older. As with meditation, there are many types of yoga: Hatha, Iyengar, Kundalini, Ashtanga, Vinyasa, Bikram (or hot), Yin, Restorative, Anusara, and Jivamukti yoga. As with meditation, it is useful to find the yoga practice or practices which you best enjoy. 

 

Beyond reducing stress and anxiety, the practice of yoga can improve heart health, reduce chronic pain, promote better sleep, and increase flexibility and balance. A YouTube search reveals many different types of yoga videos. Try a few different ones to find the teacher and type of yoga you enjoy.

 

Yoga Pose
Woman napping

 

3. Take A Nap

 

As discussed in our blog on naps, even a quick 10 minutes nap reduces stress. Sleep allows the brain to clear toxins and reduces cortisol, the stress hormone. Schedule a 10 to 20 minute power nap to help reduce your stress.

4. Stress Relief Techniques

  • Deep breathing. Stress causes short, rapid breathing (preparing you to outrace a tiger). Take a few deep, slow breathes from your diaphragm and reduce your stress.
  • Visualization. Picture a peaceful place. Use as many of your senses in creating your peaceful place. When tension strikes, close your eyes for a moment are visualize your peaceful place.
  • Progressive relaxation. Start from your toes and slowly work up to your head, relaxing each muscle as you move up your body.

 

Relaxing

5. Turn Stress On Its Head

 

Feeling out of control can spike anxiety and stress. Sheltering in place and working from home for the first time can be very stressful. Once the technical side of working from home has been resolved, step back and see if you can turn the negative around. Have there been projects you have not had the time to tackle? (Think of the feeling of accomplishment once that project is done!)  Are there skills you have been wanting to learn or pick back up any neglected passions? (Do something fun!) Have a desire to be creative? (Being creative lower stress.) 

While none of us can change the events happening in the world, we do have control over our perceptions. For those of us fortunate enough to not be fighting for our lives, let’s take a moment to be grateful for our health. An attitude of gratitude not only lowers stress;  it also improves our lives by reminding us of all that do have.

 

What else are you grateful for today?

 

To your health.

Dianne Hinton, NP IFM-C

 

Fun activities: reading, scrapbooking, baking bread, cleaning a closet
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REDUCE YOUR STRESS & BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

 

Researchers have confirmed that stress can negatively impact your immune system. To fully understand how stress affects your immune system, let’s explore how your immune system works, what happens to your bodies when it’s stressed, how to manage stress and how to boost your immune system.

 

Immune System

 

Immune System

 

 

The immune system is your body’s defense system and essential to your survival. To function properly, your immune system must detect invaders, such as viruses, and distinguish them from your own healthy cells. 

Immune System

 

 

Parts of the Human Immune System

Mucous Membranes:

Mucous membranes secrete mucus, which has protective antibodies. Mucous membranes are in the areas which are prime entry points for invaders: mouth, nose, eyelids, windpipe, and lungs. 

 

Tonsils:

Your tonsils stop invaders entering your body through your mouth or your nose as they contain a lot of white blood cells responsible for killing germs.

 

Lymphatic System:

Your lymphatic system is a network of vessels and nodes that transports and filters lymph fluid containing antibodies and white blood cells.

 

Thymus:

Some of your white cells mature in the thymus.

 

Lymph Nodes:

Lymph nodes are where white blood cells sample information brought in from your body. If they recognize invaders, they will eliminate the invaders.

 

Spleen:

Your spleen processes information from your bloodstream. White blood cells are enriched in specific areas of the spleen, and upon recognizing invaders, they will respond accordingly.

 

Bone Marrow:

 

Your bone marrow contains stem cells that can develop into white blood cells that are important first-line responders to infection.

 

Key Player in the Immune System

White Blood Cells:

White blood cells are on constant patrol, looking for invaders. Once an invader is found, the white blood cells eliminate it. White blood cells also remember each novel invader encountered, so as to more quickly eliminate future attacks by that invader.

Supporting Players: 

 

Skin:

The skin is usually the first line of defense. Skin cells produce important antimicrobial proteins. In addition to the mucous membrane, tears and saliva protect your body where there are openings in your skin as they contain an enzyme that breaks down the cell wall of many bacteria.

 

Lungs:

In addition to enabling us to obtain needed oxygen and getting rid of carbon dioxide, our lungs have an important immunity role.  Mucus is secreted which keeps the airways moist and traps unwanted particles that have been inhaled. The lungs remove unwanted debris by either sending it to the gut or coughing it out. The lungs also contain specialized white blood cells that destroy foreign particles in the lungs. 

Digestive Tract:

Your gut has to deal with the pathogens in everything you ingest.

Innate immunity

We are all born with some level of immunity, such as skin and mucous membranes. If an invader manages to dodge the innate immune system, adaptive or acquired immunity kicks in.

Adaptive (acquired) immunity

 

This develops as we go through life. As we are exposed to diseases or get vaccinated, we build up antibodies to different invaders. An immunization introduces weakened invaders in such a way that we do not become sick but still produce antibodies. Because your body saves copies of the antibodies, it is protected if the threat should reappear later in life.

 

White blood cell 600 x 600
MInd Body

 

Mind-Body Connection with Immune System

Do different mental states affect how our bodies function? Emerging evidence is supporting a mind-body connection. In recent years, research has suggested that emotions like stress and worry, when they persist long-term, can negatively affect our immune system. As seen in research with college students, chronic feelings of stress reduce our immunity.

 

Driving in a storm 300 x 600

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Stress and Cortisol

When you hear the word stress, do you think all stress is bad? Stress can be good.  Examples of good stress include physical stress on muscles or your vascular system when exercising, alertness in response to psychological stress such as taking an exam or pay attention to driving during bad weather.

 

One of the main hormones released under stressful conditions is cortisol. Cortisol mobilizes a “fight-or-flight” mode, increasing blood pressure and heart rate. 

 

When your body encounters an invader, your immune system responds. Part of this response causes inflammation, which is often a good thing (it means your immune system is working). Another interesting property of cortisol is that it acts as an anti-inflammatory signal, meaning that it acts as an “off switch” for your immune system’s inflammatory response.

 

Having cortisol turn off your immune system in response to a short-term issue, say being chased by a saber-toothed cat or taking a final exam, is good. The problem arises when chronic stress becomes your norm.

 

If you are stressed for a long time, your body never gets the signal to return to normal functioning. This can weaken your immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to viral infections and frequent illnesses. Your regular vaccines will not work as well if you have chronic stress.

 

Stress 600 x 600

 

How Chronic Stress Affects Your Immune System

Chronic stress can negatively impact many of your body systems, from muscular to cardiovascular. Researchers have found evidence that 75% to 90% of human disease is related to chronic stress and inflammation. While short term suppression of the immune system is not dangerous, chronic suppression leaves the body vulnerable to infection and disease. For a vaccine to work, there needs to be both antibody and virus-specific white blood cell response. Changes in the immune response by chronic stress can negatively impact both antibody and white blood cell response to viral vaccines.

 

Boost Immune

Ways To Boost Your Immune System

  • Stress reduction: Practice stress reduction strategies regularly.
  • Sleep: Practice good sleep hygiene and maintain consistent sleep hours.
  • Exercise: Moderate, regular physical activity helps to boost immune system function by raising levels of infection-fighting white blood cells and antibodies, increasing circulation, and decreasing stress hormones. 
  • Nutritious foods: Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Include fermented vegetables or other probiotic-containing foods.
  • If you smoke, stop smoking.
  • If you drink alcohol, only drink in moderation.
  • Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and cooking meats thoroughly.
  • Take the appropriate supplements for your body. A functional medicine practitioner can help you identify the supplements you need.

 

 

 

Stress Reduction Strategies

  • Exercise regularly
  • Reduce or eliminate caffeine
  • Aromatherapy
  • Keep a journal
  • Spend time with friends, family, and pets
  • Laugh daily
  • Deep breathing, meditation, yoga
  • Take a bubble bath or sauna
  • Get a massage
  • Set boundaries and say no
  • Listen to music
  • Be creative
  • Talk with a therapist

 

Reduce Stress in Mind & Body 600 x 600

 

Understanding the role chronic stress plays in compromising your health should inspire you to take charge in lowering your stress. Find the stress-reduction strategies which work for you and employ them daily. Implement the steps to boost your immune system. Your future self will thank you.

 

To your health.

 

Dianne Hinton NP, PA, IFM-C

 

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WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR LIFE? SPEND TIME IN NATURE!

 

Who has not felt better after spending time in nature, whether backpacking in the wilderness or eating lunch in a city park? Science confirms what we knew instinctively: being in nature heals. 

Being in Nature Improves Health

Research from the University of East Anglia found that being in nature reduced the risk of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, premature death, preterm birth, stress, and high blood pressure. 

Walking along the shore

 

Exercise helps reduce various health risks. Being in nature encourages exercise (walking along the shore of the ocean, hiking through the forest, swimming in a lake). The research found that exercising in nature provides additional benefits by reducing the perceived levels of exertion.

 

Being in Nature Improves Brain Function

 

Reading beside the lake

 

 

A 2019 Frontiers In Psychology article reported on the positive effects of nature on cognitive performance. A study at Stanford, California supports the idea that being nature improves brain function. A recent review of hundreds of studies has found evidence of a cause-and-effect relationship that being in nature led to improvements in attention span. 

Being in Nature Improves Your Mood and Reduces Your Stress

 

In a research paper, scientist Ryan Lumber, Miles Richardson, and David Sheffield found that being close to nature evokes positive emotions and a recent study, published in The Journal of Positive Psychology, found that even spending as little as five minutes outdoors was linked to significant mood boost. A study from the University of Exeter Medical School in En­gland found that, on average, the people in the study who moved to greener areas experienced an immediate improvement in mental health.

 

Joy being in nature

 

Being in Nature Improves Your Mood and Reduces Your Stress

 

In a research paper, scientist Ryan Lumber, Miles Richardson, and David Sheffield found that being close to nature evokes positive emotions and a recent study, published in The Journal of Positive Psychology, found that even spending as little as five minutes outdoors was linked to significant mood boost. A study from the University of Exeter Medical School in En­gland found that, on average, the people in the study who moved to greener areas experienced an immediate improvement in mental health.

 

 

Hiking through waterfall

 

Being in Nature Improves Your Mood and Reduces Your Stress

 

In a research paper, scientist Ryan Lumber, Miles Richardson, and David Sheffield found that being close to nature evokes positive emotions and a recent study, published in The Journal of Positive Psychology, found that even spending as little as five minutes outdoors was linked to significant mood boost. A study from the University of Exeter Medical School in En­gland found that, on average, the people in the study who moved to greener areas experienced an immediate improvement in mental health.

 

Frisbee at the park

 

Now that you know that being in nature has so many positive effects on your health, let’s pack a picnic and go play frisbee in the park!

 

To your health.
Dianne Hinton NP, PA, IFM-C

 

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Just what is Functional Medicine?  Simply put…. I call it getting to the “cause” of a health issue. Rashes, High Pressure, Arthritis, Obesity, Insomnia, and Fatigue are a few of the issues she’s helped us with.  But what I really like best is; she doesn’t say “here, take this pill” and it’ll “treat the symptoms”.  She treats the “cause” of those symptoms so they truly go away without requiring “pills”.  Our bodies are healing, and the we feel we’re the healthiest we’ve been in a long time! What we’ve discovered about the manner in which our bodies “had been” functioning previously, from the in depth tests she recommends, was pretty astounding. We’ve learned so much since starting to see her as our practitioner, I would never choose to go back to an Allopathic doctor!